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Kenyan Ndegwa family transfers $14.7 million in NCBA Group shares to family firm

NCBA Group was formed through the merger of NIC Bank Group and Commercial Bank of Africa Group.

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Andrew Ndegwa.

As part of their move to gain direct control of the Nairobi-based financial services holding NCBA Group, the family of the late Kenyan banker Philip Ndegwa has successfully transferred its stake in the company to First Chartered Securities, the family’s investment vehicle.

The arrangement, which marks the latest restructuring of the Ndegwa family’s interest in the banking sector, saw their stake in NCBA Group rise by 12.7 million shares to 12.52 percent.

This comes nearly three years after NCBA Group was formed through the merger of NIC Bank Group, led by the Ndegwa family, and Commercial Bank of Africa Group, led by the wealthy Kenyatta family, resulting in Kenya’s third-largest bank.

At the end of 2021, all 70.9 million NCBA shares held by ICEA Lion Asset Management Limited were transferred to First Chartered Securities.

The share-transfer agreement was also strengthened by an additional purchase, which increased the family’s direct interest in First Chartered Securities to 12.52 percent, or 206.29 million shares. From their stake, the Ndegwa family received a total dividend of Ksh464.15 million ($4 million).

NCBA Group is a Nairobi-based financial services conglomerate that operates as a non-operating holding through its vast network of subsidiaries in Tanzania, Rwanda, Uganda and Cote d’Ivoire.

Under the leadership of Philip Ndegwa’s sons, James and Andrew, the group has grown into one of the leading financial services groups in East Africa. James and Andrew Ndegwa own 4.23- and 4.3-percent stake in NCBA Group, respectively.

To drive the bank’s strategic positioning as a leader in the financial services industry, management has announced plans to open more branches in Kenya and other markets as it seeks to grow deposits and its retail client base.

Due to strong performance from its banking, unit trust and investment banking operations, the group’s full-year net profit more than doubled from Ksh4.6 billion ($40.1 million) in 2020 to Ksh10.2 billion ($88.9 million) at the end of 2021.

NCBA Group reported a profit after tax of Ksh3.41 billion ($29.4 million) for the quarter ending March 31, a 20-percent increase over the Ksh2.84 billion ($24.5 million) reported during the same period in 2021.

East Africa

Kenyan businessman John Kimani receives $1.2 million in dividends from agro-allied firm, Kakuzi

Kimani owns a 32.3-percent stake in Kenyan agricultural company.

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Kenyan businessman John Kimani.

Despite a double-digit decline in the profit of Kenya-based agro-allied company Kakuzi in 2021, Kenyan businessman and leading media mogul John Kimani was paid a dividend of Ksh139.3 million ($1.2 million) from his stake in the agricultural firm on Friday.

Kimani, one of the Nairobi Securities Exchange’s wealthiest investors, owns a 32.3-percent stake in Kakuzi, He also controls substantial equity positions in Centum Investments and Nation Media Group.

The $1.2-million dividend, which was paid into Kimani’s bank account on Fri., May 20, following shareholder approval at the group’s annual general meeting, was paid from the Ksh431-million ($3.7-million) payout approved by the company’s board based on its 2021 financial results.

At the end of 2021, Kakuzi’s board of directors proposed paying its shareholders a dividend of Ksh22 ($0.189) per share, a 22-percent increase from the Ksh18 ($0.154) per share paid last year, despite reporting a 48.6-percent drop in earnings from Ksh622.03 million ($5.43 million) in 2020 to Ksh319.74 million ($2.8 million).

The company’s 8.7-percent drop in revenue from Ksh3.61 billion ($31.5 million) to Ksh3.29 billion ($28.7 million) caused the earnings to decline, which did not prevent the company from increasing its dividend payout by 22 percent.

Kakuzi Chairman Nicholas Ng’ang’a assured shareholders that strategic plans had been activated to accelerate and enhance returns by diversifying the variety of produce delivered to domestic and global markets in an effort to reward shareholders with an even higher dividend payout in the coming years.

“We are part of a global marketplace and the products we produce often face stiff competition from producers in other countries. We, therefore, embarked on a very significant diversification program several years ago to ensure that Kakuzi is not dependent on any one crop,” Ng’ang’a said.

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Led by Kenyan banker James Mwangi, Equity Group invests $3.3 million in DRC subsidiary

Its total investment in the country is now $148.4 million.

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Kenyan banker James Mwangi.

Equity Group Holdings, Kenya’s largest financial services group led by renowned banking tycoon James Mwangi, has invested an additional Ksh383 million ($3.3 million) in its Democratic Republic of the Congo subsidiary in 2021, as it moves to scale up the operation of one of its most profitable operations outside Kenya.

Its latest investment in its DRC subsidiary brings its total investment in the country to Ksh17.3 billion ($148.4 million), second only to Kenya’s Ksh40.7 billion ($349.1 million), highlighting its interest in the Central African nation.

The move comes after the Mwangi-led banking conglomerate purchased a 7.7-percent stake in Equity Bank Congo (EBC) from the German sovereign wealth fund KfW for Ksh996 million ($8.54 million), increasing its stake in EBC to 94.3 percent.

The acquisitions in other market segments sparked a change in the group’s traditional policy, as it had never acquired any lender outside of the local market, resulting in the group gaining a significant 27-percent market share in the DRC, compared to the 15-percent organic growth that it recorded in Kenya.

Equity Group’s profit increased by 36 percent in the first quarter of 2022, from Ksh8.7 billion ($74.9 million) in the first quarter of 2021 to Ksh11.9 billion ($102.4 million) in the same period of 2022.

The strong growth in earnings can be attributed to an increase in net interest income, which increased from Ksh20.34 billion ($175.1 million) to Ksh26.67 billion ($230 million) as the group delivered a resilient financial performance despite operating environment challenges.

EBC had the highest earnings growth in the first quarter ended March, with a 269-percent increase in net profit to Ksh1.4 billion ($12 million), as margins improved.

The subsidiary contributed 12.1 percent of the group’s net income of Ksh11.9 billion ($102.1 million) in the period, a 33.7-percent increase from Ksh8.6 billion ($73.8 million).

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East Africa

Tanzania’s richest man Mohammed ‘Mo’ Dewji gives commencement speech at Georgetown University

Tanzania’s richest man also received an honorary doctorate in humane letters.

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Mohammed Dewji. ©Billionaires.Africa

Mohammed “Mo” Dewji, Tanzania’s richest man, delivered Georgetown University’s commencement address on Friday, where he also received an honorary doctorate in humane letters from President John J. DeGioia and the Georgetown McDonough School of Business.

In his speech, Dewji mused on how the interconnectedness of the world today has rendered us even more disconnected.

“Like many parents here today, I worry about the challenges facing your generation,” he said. “Today’s world makes it easier to forget our community. New apps offer simulations of human connection, but make us feel more isolated. You can sleep five feet away from a roommate, yet still feel more distanced than two isolated villages in Tanzania.”

The billionaire called on graduating students to create a sense of purpose for the environments in which which they’ll find themselves; devote themselves to service of community; and not pursue success for vainglory or the sake of self-aggrandizement.

“So, when we get lost, how do we find the natural path back to community?,” he said. “It comes from the Jesuit phrase, outlined in Georgetown’s mission statement: Cura Personalis. Care of the Person. In Tanzania, we commonly use a similar phrase: ‘Tuko Pamoja’, meaning ‘We are together.’ We are community. No matter where I travel, from rural Tanzania, to London, to right here in D.C., I’m reminded that the values of Cura Personalis and Tuko Pamoja transcend languages, politics, religions, and cultures. The need for community is universal, because it brings responsibility and purpose to our lives. Remember, graduates, your successes are not yours alone. When we focus only on ourselves, we lose sight of our community. And, eventually, we lose sight of our most precious investment: our time with each other.”

Dewji spoke of how his personal sense of purpose and desire to uplift the lives of Tanzanians inspired his decision to return to Tanzania and join his father’s commodity trading company after studying and working in the United States. Dewji also said he was dissatisfied with merely trading food and general merchandise items, and was keen to create jobs and opportunities for Tanzanians – a move that led him to pivoting his father’s company from a trading house to an industrial behemoth.

In the past two decades, Dewji has built METL Group, his family’s company, into one of the largest homegrown industrial conglomerates in East and Central Africa, with 35,000 employees and annual revenues in the region of $2 billion. The group manufactures everything from textiles and beverages to edible oils and detergents.

METL is also one of the world’s largest farmers of sisal, owns container depots and liquid storage facilities, and has an extensive property portfolio in Tanzania. Dewji, who owns 70 percent of the company today, has a net worth that Forbes estimates at $1.5 billion.

Dewji previously served as a member of parliament for Singida-Urban in Tanzania from 2005 until his retirement in 2015. He received a BSBA from the McDonough School of Business in 1998.

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